Yokohama Chinatown

Yokohama Chinatown, located about 30 minutes away from Tokyo by train, is the largest Chinatown in Japan and throughout Asia. Different from regular ramen, the noodles are served in a broth that is almost sauce like, topped with stir-fried vegetables and beansprouts that have a crunchy bite to it. It's a great dish to try and a perfect example of a Chinese dish blended with Japanese flavors.
What you find in a Japanese Chinatown won't be the exact same as visiting a city like Shanghai, but it comes a lot closer than chain restaurants like the 中華街 ランチ Japanese-Chinese Bamiyan.” There are dozens of restaurants filling every street, and most of them offer similar dishes for about the same price.

Quick little history about the area, In 1859, the Yokohama seaport was opened and many Chinese immigrants and traders arrived and formed settlements, built schools, community centers, facilities which became the start of what we today know as Chinatown.
Called tenshin, it's a style of dining where you can enjoy drinking tea while eating light dishes such as noodles, congee and 's of course fun to enjoy a restaurant meal, but you can also enjoy eating on the run in Chinatown with foods like the popular meat buns and dumplings.
Once you're on your way into Yokohama, and you want to head into Minatomirai, Yamashita Park and Chinatown, you need to change to Minatomirai Line at Yokohama Station, which will take you to Motomachi-Chukagai Station right next to Chinatown and Yamashita Park.

Today, Japan's Chinatowns are tourist spots and dining destinations, popular for their restaurants and "exotic" atmosphere, rather than residential areas of Chinese immigrants, although Yokohama's Chinatown, for example, is still home to several thousand residents of Chinese descent.
The names even sound similar, just like the Japanese ramen sounds similar to lo mein. From Tokyo Station, the fastest way to get to Chinatown is to take the JR Tokaido Main Line (bound for Odawara) until Yokohama Station. This Yokohama restaurant serves beloved staple items from Taiwanese food stands-from the House Special Crispy Duck,” deliciously seasoned with salt and black pepper, to Minced Pork Rice (Lu Rou Fan)”—come alive with authentic flavor.

As my friend and I lingered over excellent Ceylon tea and coffee (each $3.35), Emmie-san regaled us with tales of her travels, including dining at three-star restaurants in France and listening to jazz in New Orleans. I'm from TOKYO JAPAN, I've been living here for a long time.
Go figure — Yokohama's most popular mapo doufu (spicy tofu with ground beef) restaurant isn't even in Chinatown. Yokohama Chinatown, or 横浜中華街 (yokohama chukagai) is not only the largest in Japan, but in Asia; and continues to be ranked as one of the best around the world.

Yokohama's Chinatown is a great place to find the ice cream as well as some of the other Chinese-style dishes mentioned above. Established in 1892, Manchinro Honten is Yokohama Chinatown's oldest restaurant, and specializes in Cantonese cuisine. Although the restaurant business is today's most typical occupation, Chinese restaurants did not appear to begin until the 1890's.
We were treated to an unforgettable dining experience with uniformed waiters in white gloves serving all (veggie and seafood) dim sum I can imagine - but one dish was about the price of a typical All-You-Can-Eat Chinatown deal. It is tough to think of Chinese food when driving through Japan's ceaseless acres of tea bushes and rice paddies.
Menus and food samples at many establishments let you know what to expect before going inside, and you may find yourself pleasantly bewildered by the dizzying array of Chinese cuisine to choose from. Step off the hectic streets of Chinatown for a top lunch or dinner, to refuel your exploration of the city.

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